Ray Covington Superintendent
Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center

Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center

195 Georgia Mountain Experiment Station Rd., Blairsville, GA, 30512

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GARDEN CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

 

Our Work and Priorities

The Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center lies in the uppermost part of the state in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Established in 1930, the 415-acre station provides assistance to farmers in the mountain region, giving them information applicable to the area with its own distinct soil and climatic conditions. It resides in USDA Zone 7A, having a shorter 180-day growing season with an average rainfall of 57 inches.

Current research focuses on commodities including apples, grapes, blueberries, field corn, sweet corn, soybeans, fescue, orchard grass, alfalfa, ryegrass, tomatoes, various ornamentals and beef cattle. The climate is perfect for evaluating cold hardiness for new cultivars that include Alfalfa, Crape Myrtle, Vitex, Abelia, Bermuda, Centipede and Zoysia turf grasses. Additionally, UGA graduate students often conduct their own research at the center.

Georgia Mountain REC hosts over 4,000 children annually with the help of the Community Council. This group also promotes educational seminars and maintains a public garden on the campus. We also closely collaborate with nearby Extension faculty and the Union County Extension Office.

About us


We investigate the latest production and technological practices, striving for producer profitability and sustainability.
Research and Education Centers (RECs) are hubs for innovation and discovery that address the most critical issues facing agricultural production throughout the state. Ultimately, our findings are shared with stakeholders through the extension and outreach efforts of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
A drone photo shows turfgrass research plots on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
UGA receives federal grant to study turfgrass water conservation using artificial intelligence
When it comes to taking care of a lawn — whether at home or on a golf course — proper watering makes the difference between a beautiful landscape and a muddy mess. Knowing when and where to water turfgrass can be a tricky process, but thanks to a group of researchers at the University of Georgia and Rutgers University, lawn irrigation could soon be much easier to handle.
Wayne Hanna, best known for developing TifTuf, the strongest turfgrass ever produced at UGA, has established several endowments supporting research at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Renowned researcher establishes endowment to support Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center
For nearly 50 years, turfgrass researcher Wayne Hanna pursued his professional goals at the University of Georgia, first with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), then as a full professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

CAES Events

FABricate is an entrepreneurial pitch contest where students develop their idea for a new food product, new agricultural technology, new food or agricultural-related business or new environmental or sustainable business. Students can expand their leadership and business skills through this competition where they’ll develop an idea for a new food product, agricultural business or environmental opportunity. Learn more at this informational meeting about how to possibly win $10,000.
Oct 20
6:00PM - 7:00PM FABricate Information Session Zell B Miller Student Learning Center, ATHENS, GA
Isabel leads the Texas A&M Potato Breeding Program. The goal of the program is to develop high-yielding potato varieties, mainly for the fresh and chipping markets, adapted to Texas growing conditions. She combines conventional and molecular tools to enhance the efficiency of potato breeding efforts and to maximize genetic gains from selection. Isabel Vales received her Licentiate Degree (and Degree Thesis) in Biological Sciences (specialization in molecular biology) from the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain, in 1992, and her Doctorate in Biology (maize breeding and genetics) from the University of Vigo, Spain (1996) in collaboration with the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). She worked as Post-doctoral Research Associate (maize genetics) at the University of Minnesota from 1997 to 1998. From 1999 to 2005, Research Assistant Professor (cereal genetics) at Oregon State University. From 2005 to 2010, she led the Oregon Potato Variety Development Program (Associate Professor - potato breeding and Genetics) and the Oregon Potato Foundation Program. From 2010 to 2012, she was Principal Scientist (pigeonpea breeding and genetics) at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India. She worked as an Independent Scientific Advisor from 2013 to 2016 in Washington State and joined Texas A&M in 2017. Isabel participated in the release of more than 24 potato varieties, including specialty types with high levels of antioxidants, and published more than 70 referee papers. She has been active in undergraduate and graduate teaching (potato production, plant physiology, molecular breeding) and training. Seminar Location: CAGT room 128 Athens; and via zoom at Tifton and Griffin campuses. Note: Zoom meeting ID will be sent out prior to the seminar.
Oct 21
4:00PM - 5:00PM IPBGG SEMINAR: Development of Climate-change-ready Potato Varieties to Overcome Heat Stress by Dr. Isabel Vales Center For Applied Genetic Technologies, ATHENS, GA
Guest speaker Dr. Haley Oliver, Professor of Food Science at Purdue University will present Food Safety - Local Grocery Stores to Informal Markets Around the World on Wednesday, Oct. 27 at 10 a.m. via Zoom. All are invited. 
Oct 27
10:00AM - 11:00AM Food Safety - Local Grocery Stores to Informal Markets Around the World https://zoom.us/j/7457247689